Monthly Archives: May 2013

TCB Flanders Golden Dubbel

Recipe by: Taft Canyon Brewers

Grains:
.5lbs Biscuit Malt
.5lbs Special B Malt
3 lbs Pilsen Malt

Extract:
5lbs Pilsner Liquid Malt Extract (60 minutes)

Hops:
1 oz Cascade Whole Leaf 7.5%AA (60 minutes)
1 oz Cascade Whole leave 7.5% AA (30 minutes)
2 oz Goldings (US) Pellets 4.0%AA (10 Minutes)

Yeast: Flanders Golden Ale Yeast (Wyeast 3739)

Misc: 1lb Belgian Brown Sugar (10 minutes)

Mash Steps:

60 minutes at 145 degrees (12 quarts)
Batch sparge at 170 degrees (8 quarts)

Fermentation Temperature: 62 F

Notes:

Original Gravity: 1.061
Final Gravity: 1.005
Final ABV: 7.4%
IBUs: 29.8

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Beer Recipes, Belgian Dubbel, Making Beer

Flanders Golden Ale Yeast

Yesterday I swung by Hops and Berries to buy yeast for a Belgian dubbel. I ended up walking out with a specialty Flanders Golden Ale yeast (Wyest 3739). I was going to use this in the dubbel, but now I’m wondering if I should use if for something else. Anyone else had good success with this specific yeast?

I’m making the starter tonight.

Flanders Golden Ale Yeast (Wyeast 3739)

Flanders Golden Ale Yeast (Wyeast 3739)

Leave a comment

Filed under Making Beer

The first Nano-Micro-LEGO Brewery in Fort Collins

Last night, my sons and I needed a new project. So we built the smallest craft brewery in Fort Collins. And yes, those are runes from the Mines of Moria. We spared no expense.

LEGO Craft Brewery

The yellow-skinned people of Fort Collins finally have a brewery to call their own.

1 Comment

Filed under General

TCB Citra IPA v2

Recipe by: Taft Canyon Brewers

Grains:
6lbs Maris Otter (crisp)

Extract:
6 lbs Pale Malt Extract (60 minutes)

Hops:
1 oz Citra Whole Leaf 15.6%AA (60 minutes)
1 oz Citra Whole Leaf 15.6%AA (30 minutes)
1 oz Citra Whole Leaf 15.6%AA (20 minutes)
1 oz Citra Whole Leaf 15.6%AA (10 minutes)
2 oz Citra Whole Leaf 15.6%AA (Dry Hop)

Yeast: Pacific Ale (White Labs – WLP041)

Misc:

Mash Steps:

60 minutes at 145 degrees (12 quarts)
Batch sparge at 170 degrees (8 quarts)

Fermentation Temperature: 68 F

Notes:

Original Gravity: 1.070
Potential ABV: 6.4%
Gravity at Rack: 1.021 (6.5%)
Final Gravity:
Final ABV:
IBUs:

Leave a comment

Filed under Beer Recipes, India Pale Ale, Making Beer

Yellow Diamond Belgian Pale Ale

Recipe by: Randy Mosher / Taft Canyon Brewers

20130511-202230.jpg

Belgian Pale Ale in the primary

Specialty Grains:
4 lbs Belgium Pale Ale
3 lb Belgium Munich
1 lb Aromatic Malt
6 oz Caramunich Malt
1 lb 8 oz Turbinado Sugar

Hops:
0.65 oz Northern Brewer – 9.4% AA – Pellets (90 minutes)
0.44 oz Saaz – 3.2% AA – Pellets (90 minutes)
0.65 oz Saaz – 3.2% AA – Pellets (15 minutes)
Other:
0.5 tab Whirlfloc (5 minutes)
1 oz Dried Sour Orange Zest
0.5 oz Coriander Seed

Yeast:
Belgian Ale (White Labs #WLP550)
1.5 liter starter

Fermentation Temperature: 64 F

Original Gravity: 1.050
Potential ABV: 6.8%
Final Gravity: 1.010
Final ABV: 5.5%
Bitterness: 30 IBU

Mash Steps:
60 minutes at 152 degrees (12 quarts)
Mashout at 209 degrees (7 quarts)
Batch Sparge at 170 degrees (13 quarts)

Notes: Grain volume adjusted for Brew House Efficiency of 70%.
Brew History:I found this recipe in Mosher’s ‘Radical Brewing’ and figured I had to give it a try. Due to work travel, I was not able to rack this beer like we usually do, so it spent two weeks in the primary. Even after two weeks, there was still a far bit of yeast (kraeusen) at the top. I am figuring the yeast stalled, and might have started again…Not sure. Anyway, the gravity was down to about 1.010, so I figured I would bottle anyway and see what happens. Time will tell…one month bottle conditioning to be exact.

Brewed: April 29, 2013
Bottled: May 11, 2013

20130511-202549.jpg

Belgian Pale Ale Final Gravity – Ready to bottle

Leave a comment

Filed under Beer Recipes, Making Beer

You know what would really suck?

It would really suck if, while you were in the middle of kegging a batch of homebrew, you didn’t notice that the end of the siphon that you had in your bucket of sanitizer had worked itself loose and was running all over your kitchen floor. And it would REALLY suck if you didn’t realize it until 4 gallons had spilled on the floor. And it would REALLY REALLY suck if, after you thought you had cleaned it all up, you realized that it had soaked through your ceiling and created a huge puddle in your finished basement. Man, that would suck.

1 Comment

Filed under General