Our first IPA home recipe – 12.5% potential ABV. Whole hops everywhere.


Tonight we brewed another IPA – this time our own recipe. There’s something about adding copious amounts of hops to beer that makes me giddy – I literally giggle as I add them to the wort.   6 pounds of specialty grains and 10 pounds of malt extract should make this a deep flavored IPA with plenty of aroma and kick. Fellow hombrewer James joined me for this round of brewing and brought some of his own tasty P38 IPA along to sample.

Potential ABV coming in at almost 13%. Giddy up.

Potential ABV coming in at almost 13%. Giddy up.

The hydrometer registered a potential alcohol of over 12%, so if we end up in the 10% range, this will be a treat.

6 pounds of specialty grains is the most we’ve ever used up to this point, and we’re still learning how to get the water/grains ratio correct. I’ve been using tools like Beersmith and BrewersFriend and both are good for different things – but neither totally addressed this (at least not that I could find). I also couldn’t find anything in The Complete Joy of Homebrewing that talked about these ratios, but I think we’re getting close.

This time around we started with 3 gallons for 6 pounds of grains and it seemed about right, keeping the grains suspended in water so that they wouldn’t burn on the bottom (accompanied by frequent stirring). We added another gallon of water when we raised the temp and then another when we sparged- resulting in 5 gallons of wort that we brought to a boil and then added the extract. The extract raised the volume in the kettle, which then cooked back down to almost exactly 5 gallons after 60 minutes of boiling.

The first two ounces of hops get added to the wort.

The first two ounces of hops get added to the wort.

We also bottled the High Plains Saison tonight and dry hopped the Redbeard Magee Oatmeal Stout and the Hop Warrior IPA. There’s a lot of beer in this house.

Cheers,

Steve

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